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Contract dispute resolution

Unfortunately within any business, contractual disputes regularly occur.

Our expert team has the experience and knowledge necessary to help you resolve your dispute in the most favourable way possible.

The first step of any dispute is to see if it can be resolved informally.

This may be through an employer's grievance procedure or with the help of the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS), which offers a free Early Conciliation Service (ECS).

However, sometimes alternative dispute resolution is not always possible and gaining expert advice at this stage is vital in order to achieve a successful outcome.

Areas of contract dispute resolution that we cover:

  • Civil Fraud
  • Agency Disputes
  • Misrepresentation claims
  • Breaches of trust
  • Breach of Contract
  • Partnership Dissolution
  • Partnership Disputes
  • Advising on Force Majeure clauses activated by the Covid-19 pandemic (not all such clauses are enforceable)
view our contract dispute fees

 

Why choose KLS Law?

KLS Law offers over 25 combined years' experience successfully litigating cases and providing quality legal services.

Our contract dispute legal team offers the proficiency and experience necessary to get you the right result for your situation, so you can rest easy having full confidence in the legal team representing you.

If you would like to learn more, we invite you to contact us via phone or our enquiry form to arrange a free initilal consultation.

We would be happy to arrange your confidential, free initial consultation over the phone or in-person at a location that best suits you. Although we are based in Warrington (near Stockton Heath with free parking available), we are more than happy to meet at a location of your choosing.

search Case Study: The perils of oral contracts

The case of Wells v Bevan recently came before the Supreme Court. It showed the perils of oral contracts as both parties gave very different accounts of a telephone conversation. The court based its decision on context, saying this was the important feature in such cases. If at all possible, such important conversations should be recorded or at least a contemporaneous note kept.